• Fair Uni's for our future
    In the midst of the COVID crisis and its effects on universities’ finances and the pressures on many universities to cut jobs we can only hope that a broad public interest lens is applied to universities future rather than a simple cost reduction lens.
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    Created by Chloe Gaul
  • NSW: Strengthen the Lockdown, Increase Support Payments!
    The Covid-19 situation in NSW is extremely concerning. Once again, the failure to build proper, dedicated quarantine facilities has resulted in a serious local outbreak, this time of the incredibly contagious Delta strain. Vaccination rates remain woefully low. The NSW Government has acted far too slowly and half-heartedly in relation to the current outbreak. Nobody enjoys lockdowns, but the failure to enact a serious lockdown soon enough has let this outbreak grow, and now means that the lockdown must be extended and strengthened. Allowing the virus to spread would be a health disaster, not just for NSW but for all Australia.
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    Created by Joshua Lees
  • Save the ANU health service!
    This has been part of a broader trend of universities outsourcing the provision of services to external companies at a lower cost, usually involving an attack on workers’ wages and conditions. With the potential collapse of the Co-op imminent, it’s possible that its ANU clinic will be taken over by another external company. This is no solution for staff or patients. Despite being a registered charity, the Co-op has had to compete with private billing clinics. It’s inability to do so is what has thrown the future of its staff and the patients who rely on its services up in the air. Unless the ANU steps in to run the service directly there’s nothing to stop this from happening again. Seeing a doctor is already more expensive in Canberra than almost anywhere else in Australia. Canberra has the lowest bulk-billing rate of any electorate in the country, with only 32% of patients having their GP appointments bulk-billed - well below the national average of 86.2%. Canberrans also pay higher out-of-pocket costs at mixed-billing clinics. Free, accessible healthcare should be a right, not a privilege. Let’s end the outsourcing of vital university services.
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    Created by ANU Education Activism Network Picture
  • Stop the LANTITE: It’s holding our degrees!!
    Many people believe that these test results DO NOT represent our ability to teach, in education there are far more important factors to be an effective teacher such as behaviour management, relationship building, resilience, organisation, passion, judgments and drive. There are also flaws in this test. With the majority of questions being multiple choice it has been heard of that students will sit it for 30 minutes, guess the answers then receive their results to find that they have passed. Whereas students and myself who have achieved HDs in their assessments, and have passed exams, may fail this test. Therefore achieving nothing and leading to a low sense of worth!
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    Created by Daniella M
  • Secure jobs at Monash University
    Dr Jan Bryant has been teaching in Monash's Art, Design and Architecture faculty for 11 years. In that time she's taught thousands of students, supervised dozens of PhDs and published books, papers and essays. For all of those eleven years, Jan has been employed on short-term contracts. Now Monash is letting her go. To add insult to insecurity, Monash University advertised a job for Jan's exact role, and Jan applied. Monash then told her she wasn't good enough for the role. No-one got the job. Jan is the unwilling face of workplace insecurity in Australian higher education. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 17,000 university workers have lost their jobs. Monash University's Art, Design and Architecture faculty is in crisis. Several employees have resigned due to workplace bullying. Now MADA has engineered the departure of a popular teacher. The NTEU asked the Dean of the Faculty, Professor Shane Murray, to meet with us. He refused. Jan is a beloved teacher at Monash University. As a result of this decison, many of her PhD students will be left in the lurch. Jan says: "I've struggled with 11 years of insecure work, but through that time have worked hard, and been dedicated to my teaching and research, only to discover that my contract is not being renewed." "I face a precarious future." Jan deserves job security, and her students deserve to keep their teacher. Every employee at Monash University deserve secure employment.
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    Created by Ben Eltham Picture
  • Reject Latham's unsafe 'Parental Rights' Education Bill
    Latham’s Bill puts the livelihood of every teacher in NSW at risk because the Bill says NESA must revoke your teacher accreditation if you fall foul, however innocently, of the strictures in the Bill. Teachers will be required to work under the constant threat of their accreditation to teach being revoked if they were to address any topics in a classroom that is contradictory to the “moral and ethical standards and the political and social values” of any parent of a student in their class. Precisely what this means in a society where parents have diverse religious, political, and social views is unclear. Teachers are also prohibited from supporting or even acknowledging the experience of students who may be exploring or discovering a diverse gender identity. Schools do not teach gender fluidity to their students, but they have a duty of care to all their students. To seek to govern the interactions between counsellors and teachers and their students in such a heavy handed way is to breach this duty of care (potentially exposing the school to legal liability through civil action) at put at risk the psychological health of students, potentially leading to child protection allegations. Teachers and students must have an environment in which they can teach and learn in a safe, supportive, and affirming environment if they are to achieve their full education potential. Student wellbeing is about a sense of belonging and connectedness. Developing the skills to make positive and healthy choices to support learning and achievement must be delivered in a safe and accepting school climate.
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    Created by Angus Hoy
  • Don't Tear Up Library Funding
    Australian Services Union members throughout South Australia provide crucial library services to our local communities but State Government funding for our libraries runs out on June 30. If Premier Steven Marshall cuts funding to our libraries, local communities will lose access to: books, access to computers and community activities for new mums, the elderly and the wider community. Approximately 80% of the library workforce are women. Cuts to library funding will mean cuts to jobs when South Australia is facing the highest unemployment rate in the country. We need your support to save our libraries.
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    Created by Daniel Spencer
  • Stop Late Submission Penalty Increasing to 10%
    Macquarie Students Against Uni Cuts have been informed by staff of the uni's plans to increase the late assignment penalty for Arts in Semester 2, an increase from a 2% to a 10% deduction per day! After countless cuts, restructures and sackings, the Macquarie's management are already looking for new ways to turn our university into a degree factory. This is made worse considering the Liberals 2020 education bill, which states that any first year student who fails 50% of their courses will be kicked off HECS! The overwhelming majority of domestic students rely entirely on the HECS system to study, so many students would be kicked out of their studies for financial reasons. Student life is already stressful, with most students having to balance their studies with part-time work. In the middle of a global pandemic and economic recession, this attack is absolutely shameful. Attacks such as these will hurt the people who are already the most disadvantaged, particularly LGBTI+ people, working class women, Indigenous Australians and other oppressed minorities. Amy Lamont MQ Students Against Uni Cuts
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    Created by Macquarie Students Against Uni Cuts MQ Picture
  • We Need Safe Apprenticeships
    A good apprenticeship provides all the tools you need to get started in a trade, setting you on the path to a rewarding career. But these days, some apprenticeships can be like the Wild West, with cowboy operators not properly training us, leaving us unsupervised, stealing our wages or - worst of all - putting our lives at risk by forcing us to do unsafe work. I went through a lot of this during my apprenticeship. I was excited to start my Boilermaker apprenticeship. I said to everyone; I want to fabricate things, forge things and it's going to be really cool. But during my apprenticeship I'd be working inside these barrels, no ventilation, no extraction fans, nothing. I'd have a p95 mask and I'd be in there for four hours, but within an hour the thing would be black and you couldn't breathe through it. I'd ask the boss for a new one and he would ask why I'd needed a new one. Often there was no one supervising me and the boss wouldn't release me and the other apprentices so we could go to Tafe. Unfortunately, my story isn't unique. It's become so bad that less than half of Victorian apprentices ever finish their training. This has to stop. Sign my petition to call on the Victorian Government to create a license system and regulatory body to protect apprentices like me.
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    Created by Jae Wassell, former apprentice
  • No cuts at UOW
    The cuts come at a time when UOW is moving many classes online in what looks to be a permanent arrangement. Meanwhile, students are being made to pay the same fees for lower quality, online degrees which often resemble tuning in to a Youtube channel. Fees for many degrees are also increasing, with Arts fees doubling.
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    Created by Jamie Caulfield
  • Extend La Trobe Library Hours
    Students do not exist on a normal 9-5 schedule. We are not always available during 'standard' work hours to come into the library and study. With many of us in casual or irregular work, caring for loved ones, or taking classes at odd times, we need a University library that is as flexible as we have to be. La Trobe students are back on campus. We're trying to succeed in our studies and trying to access the necessary resources to do so. For many of us, the library is one of the few safe and secure places where we can do this. As major assessments and exams draw closer, we deserve the best chance of success - to deprive us of a safe space to study does not allow that. La Trobe University must extend the Library hours immediately!
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    Created by La Trobe University Student Union Picture
  • Language Teachers at The University of Queensland are under attack.
    Senior managers at the University of Queensland have proposed the outsourcing of language teaching from the Institute of Continuing and TESOL Education (ICTE) that will see job cuts, increased casualisation, and significantly reduced wages for the same work.   UQ Senior Management proposes merging ICTE with UQ College, a wholly-owned subsidiary company of UQ that currently sits outside of UQ’s Enterprise Agreement.   The current proposal will see the loss of 13 full-time continuing Language Teacher jobs and two Academic Managers. These cuts follow the loss of 43 jobs from ICTE in 2020.  It has been stated that UQ staff who transfer to UQ College will have their existing pay and conditions preserved under the current proposal. However, no guarantee has been given that these conditions and protections will persist into the future. As it stands, the management of UQ College may seek to terminate the Enterprise Agreement pay and conditions for transferring staff after 30 June this year. Additionally, existing UQ College staff and any new employees will not receive the same wages and conditions, creating an unfair, two-tiered structure for staff – those who have and those who have-not. If the management of UQ College does seek to terminate the Enterprise Agreement, this may result in: — Pay cuts of up to 23% for Language Teachers and on average 20% for professional staff despite the work being the same — The danger of current and future casual staff losing the job security protections they have in ICTE;  — Cuts to employer superannuation contributions of 7.5% for continuing and fixed-term staff;  — Significant reductions in redundancy entitlements;  — Cuts to other workplace rights and protections currently provided under The University of Queensland Enterprise Agreement.   Because of the calibre of its teaching and professional staff, ICTE is renowned both in Australia and overseas for the quality of its English language programs. Outsourcing this work to a UQ-subsidiary, and then employing staff on the minimum terms and conditions would mean ICTE would be unable to attract the best quality teachers and administrators. This would have a direct impact on the quality of students’ learning experiences and their success in meeting learning outcomes.  There is no justification, except corporate greed, for this proposal. This type of thinking is very short term and threatens to undermine the reputation of UQ and the quality of its pathways. UQ can — and should — deliver its revised Foundation Program along with its English language pathway programs internally.
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    Created by Mike Oliver Picture