• Fighting for Fair Visa Processing Times
    There are thousands of people nationwide whose lives are stuck in limbo while they await a visa decision from the Department of Home Affairs. Many have been waiting for years with no response from government. Key points on the 887 visa: · The 887 visa is a pathway to permanent residency for temporary visa holders who have lived and worked in areas of regional Australia. · These temporary visas leave migrants vulnerable to employment, housing, family and financial instability. · 887 visa applicants are forced to live in limbo while they experience endless visa processing delays and backlogs. · The average wait time for the 887 visa is now over two years
    1,669 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Migrant Workers Centre
  • QANTAS: We want a fair deal for all workers
    Workers who have been targeted by Qantas only want their right to collective bargain and negotiate their pay and conditions. Australian Services Union members at Qantas are standing shoulder to shoulder to fight this every step of the way. We all work for one airline and have been part of one workplace agreement and one set of workplace conditions for over 20 years. We need a decent pay rise that keeps up with the cost of living not one that sends us backwards. That’s our wages policy. Qantas, workers want a fair deal for ALL staff now.
    615 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Australian Services Union Picture
  • Stop Paying Pipecon
    Ballarat Council giving money to Pipecon is a slap in the face to all of us as Ballarat ratepayers and Victorians. Councillors must immediately review this decision, award the tender for Tait St road reconstruction to another company, and apologise to the community.
    1,184 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by James Raynes
  • Climate-proof our homes: Energy efficiency standards for rentals NOW
    We spend winters shivering inside beanies, jumpers, blankets, uggs and wooly socks. In Summer we sleep with ice packs. And we pay through the nose for the privilege. More and more renters in Australia are experiencing rental stress - paying more than 40 or 50% of our incomes for homes that barely keep out the weather. Rent is skyrocketing, as are our power bills. Yet renters can’t reduce our bills by installing solar panels, insulation, more efficient hot water systems or by removing gas appliances from our homes. We’re forced to run power hungry space heaters to stay warm only to get hit with enormous power bills. More and more renters are forced to make a choice between staying warm and buying groceries. It’s more important than ever to improve the standards of rentals as power prices soar and home ownership is put further out of reach for young people. Generation United is powered by the United Workers Union. We’re a strong voice for young workers and we’re coming together to tackle the big issues that affect us - at work, at home, in our community and in our environment. Renters are speaking out, our governments must listen and act. These are just some of the stories tenants have shared with us: “The upstairs of our town house would reach over 43 degrees in summer so I slept with ice packs strapped to my body.” - Vic renter “Our house is not at all insulated. The cold days are super cold and the hot days make the house stuffy for weeks” - Aus renter “I have been getting sick once or twice a month from how cold my room gets.” - Krishan, Vic renter “Extremely cold temp in the house in winter and almost unliveable in the summer due to heat.” - WA renter “Window has been stuck open ever since 2020, 8+ requests to close it with no outcome. My 3rd winter wfh now and I have to wear puffer 24/7!” - Aus renter “I have leaks in my ceiling I’ve been complaining about since 2018, which are only getting worse and still nothing done. Can’t use my lounge room at all.” - NSW renter
    117 of 200 Signatures
    Created by gen united
  • Murdoch Staff are ready to bargain!
    Murdoch staff have been hit hard during the COVID-19 crisis: enduring staffing cuts, taking on more work, keeping the lights on for students and the broader community while management are seemingly making decisions that don't improve staff conditions or well-being. A university is a place of ideas. Murdoch's 'tagline' is "A place for free thinking" but sadly free thinking comes at a cost and it is a cost borne disproportionately by staff. With an already lean Bargaining Agreement and no real cost of living relief in sight, it's time to support Murdoch staff in their entrenched right to bargain for a more robust Bargaining Agreement. You need to send a message to management – this isn’t good enough, we can’t afford to keep going backwards, we are struggling with the lack of support, and we demand that they begin bargaining NOW. Click the link to sign the petition - send the message to management that we're ready to bargain NOW!
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    Created by NTEU WA
  • Stop Deadnaming at Universities!
    Our universities are failing when it comes to building inclusive and supporting learning environments for transgender, gender diverse and non-binary students. A recent survey of queer students in Australia conducted by the NUS Queer/LGBTQIA+ Department and RUSU Queer Department identified that every single respondent regularly experienced some form of deadnaming at university. The results from the survey revealed that: 83% of students said there was a persistent deadnaming issue at their university 93% were deadnamed on student facing platforms 20% were deadnamed by staff 43% were deadnamed on university accounts 13% were deadnamed on their student ID With the constant misgendering and deadnaming that occurs on student facing platforms and within classrooms, it is time for this issue to be addressed. We are calling on universities to end deadnaming and change their ways to ensure that the wellbeing of transgender, gender diverse and non-binary students is a priority. Universities have a duty of care towards their students, a responsibility to provide a safe learning environment that minimises opportunities for psychosocial harm. They need to acknowledge that until action is taken to end deadnaming in Australian universities, trans, non-binary and gender diverse students will continue to be at severe risk of bullying, harassment, physical violence and psychosocial harm. It is time for universities to protect vulnerable students and allow them to bring their whole selves to their studies.
    2,276 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by NUS Queer/LGBTQIA+ Department Picture
  • No New Pokies in Mparntwe/Alice Springs
    We want the centre of town to be a safe, vibrant hub of entertainment for locals and tourists to enjoy. Pokies are also the most addictive form of gambling and can negatively affect our community's physical health, emotional well-being, relationships and employment. In 2019, Australians lost over $12 billion on pokies. Mparntwe/Alice Springs already has 386 pokies – we don’t want any more!
    823 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Aia Newport
  • Better Internet for the Meander Valley
    Without proper access to fast and reliable internet, our community suffers. We cannot work as part of a connected country and world if our internet access prevents us from connecting with each other. No community should be left behind in this technological age. Residents and ratepayers of the Meander Valley refuse to be forgotten.
    34 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Ben Dudman Picture
  • Tell Sydney Trains and Transport for NSW to Stop Targeting Our Delegate
    Our elected representatives need to have the ability to represent us, the members, free of harassment and the threat of disciplinary hanging over their heads like the hangman's noose. The actions displayed from Sydney Trains set a terrible precedent and will impede the movement's ability to bargain into the future due to workplace delegates being in fear of disciplinary action that can potentially impact their employment.
    200 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Scarlett Bellette
  • Stop the NSW Government fining striking workers
    Unions of nurses, teachers, paramedics, cleaners, transport workers, child protection workers and many more are saying their jobs and conditions are under immense stress. The NSW Government is ignoring their pleas for help. Workers have been left with little choice but to strike to force the government to listen. So the NSW Government has proposed fines of up to $110,000 for striking. It's unfair and undemocratic - workers will suffer in silence and their unions fined if they take action. But it can be stopped. The Liberals and National Government does not hold a majority in Parliament. If Labor, independents and just 3 minor parties team up they will have a majority to overturn the new fines. The vote is expected in early August - which means we have just a few weeks to act. Add your name to send a clear message to members of the NSW Parliament - you must use your vote to protect essential worker's rights.
    15,450 of 20,000 Signatures
    Created by Unions NSW
  • Help Victorian unions open The Crossing
    In Victoria, the largely unregulated private rehabilitation services mean that working people are often confronted with re-mortgaging their house, taking out loans, or withdrawing their superannuation to pay for services that can cost up to $30,000 per month. Victoria’s rehabilitation system is mostly inaccessible for working people, as most stays are between 3 months and 12 months. In Australia it takes an average of 20 years for a person to seek assistance for addiction due to shame and stigma and this is a trend that is appearing across all shop floors and all industries across the State It’s clear that the current system of treatment isn’t working and requires fresh ideas and methodologies for providing suitable treatment to working people and their families and funding models that work both for patients, employers and the government. We are proposing a tri-partisan collaboration with Odyssey House for a 28-day inpatient treatment facility funded and owned by the trade union movement after an initial investment from the Andrews’ Labor Government coupled with the establishment of an outreach and outpatient service, inclusive of toolbox talks for delegates, health and safety representatives, organisers and working people from all sectors with the support of trade unions, employers and the government. We need innovative, sophisticated solutions to complex issues such as addiction. We know that we have the most cost-effective, fit-for-purpose model for working Victorians to ease the burden on our already overcrowded healthcare system. Workplace support and early intervention are crucial in supporting workers combating addiction and mental health struggles. The opening of The Crossing will change the lives of workers struggling with addiction — as well as those of their families, their workmates, and their community.
    245 of 300 Signatures
    Created by HACSU & AMWU
  • Safe Space for CaLD UWA Students!
    There is a high population of students from a variety of ethnic, migrant, and linguistic backgrounds who deserve a safe space to feel supported and welcomed in their time at UWA. Currently, UWA has 23,944 students enrolled and of those students, 46% were born outside of Australia and 25% of students spoke languages other than English at home. Experiences of racial discrimination are common among students of colour, however, many are overlooked and regarded as a 'slight comment' rather than an issue which deserves to be investigated. It is important for the plight of racial justice to extend beyond merely celebrating diversity. For an authentic sense of inclusion to be fostered, it is required of institutions to implement systems of support for CaLD students. The introduction of a safe space for the Ethnocultural Department would allow students of colour and all CaLD students the chance and space to discuss, dissect and reflect on their experiences by connecting with other students who face similar barriers and difficulties. This would also allow space for CaLD students to raise awareness among students and pointing them towards processes of resolve in the face of discrimination and utilise the UWA's complaint system that is currently existent, but not particularly accessible. Urging the need for an allocated room and therefore Ethnocultural safe space, is a necessity for UWA to be regarded as an inclusive campus for all. With the reactivation and reopening of campus, comes the obligation of the Guild President and Tenancy Chair to fast-track the bureaucratic process, and align the Ethnocultural safe space’s establishment with the increased return of students to campus. An Ethnocultural safe space would improve the campus experience for CaLD students by firstly cultivating a diverse and inclusive campus; but also filling the gaps that the University’s formal complaints processes are not able to address for CaLD students. Ultimately, a safe space would give students an outlet to express frustrations and anxieties of systemic and interpersonal racism, resulting in improved student well-being.
    241 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Adam Elyousef Picture