• Strengthen Northern Territory laws against non-fatal strangulation
    CONTENT WARNING A woman surviving non-fatal strangulation is eight times more likely to be later murdered by her domestic violence perpetrator. Like Victorian woman, Joy Rowley who was choked unconscious eight months before her murder. Her assailant “wasn't charged for six months amid police concern there was insufficient evidence". https://goo.gl/xHSG8k Survivors of strangulation are also at risk of disability or later death, with no external signs of injury, and which may be incorrectly attributed to other causes because of the delay between the assault and the appearance of symptoms. See: https://goo.gl/XEQFe9 It’s a weapon to instil fear and increase control over a victim. Professionals may miss subtle signs. Training can improve practice and policy. Victims' participation in life is affected, as are families' and communities. Child witnesses suffer disrupted education and their health may be affected. Laws which don't recognise the impact of non-fatal strangulation, or have limited applications, have been shown to let perpetrators get away with their crimes and leave victims living with violence under threat of death.
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    Created by Debra Smith Picture
  • Support laws against non-fatal strangulation in Western Australia
    CONTENT WARNING A woman surviving non-fatal strangulation is eight times more likely to be later murdered by her domestic violence perpetrator. Research by the Western Australian Council for Domestic and Family Violence Services "showed 230 new refuge clients between January and May, including six children, reported having their neck compressed. Of those, 117 said they had no visible injuries." https://goo.gl/rZxR6Y A survey in San Diego of 300 misdemeanor strangulation cases found that there were no visible injuries in 50% of cases. "Another 35% had visible injuries so minor, that they would not show up in photographs. That means that the victims in only 15% of all strangulation cases studied had [external] injuries significant enough to (1) be seen, and (2) be photographed." https://goo.gl/AL2i9B Strangulation can cause disability or later death, even with no external signs of injury. They may be incorrectly attributed to other causes. See: https://goo.gl/XEQFe9 It’s a weapon to instil fear and increase control over a victim. Professionals may miss subtle signs. Training can improve practice and policy. Victims' participation in life is affected, as are families' and communities. Child witnesses suffer disrupted education and their health may be affected. Laws not recognising the impact of non-fatal strangulation have been shown to let perpetrators get away with their crimes and leave victims living with violence under threat of death.
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    Created by Debra Smith Picture
  • Respect AFLW
    In 2019, the AFL is proposing a reduction in the number of rounds of AFLW despite an increase in the number of women's teams playing. We're demanding better. Don't let AFLW become a "gimmicky tournament". It's time for the AFL to show it has a genuine commitment to women's footy.
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    Created by Wil, Danae & Amy
  • Support laws against non-fatal strangulation in Victoria
    CONTENT WARNING A woman surviving non-fatal strangulation is eight times more likely to be later murdered by her domestic violence perpetrator. Like Joy Rowley who was choked unconscious eight months before her murder. Her assailant “wasn't charged for six months amid police concern there was insufficient evidence". https://goo.gl/xHSG8k The State Coroner noted "the introduction of a stand-alone offence of strangulation, suffocation or choking in Victoria may significantly help to ensure strangulation is treated commensurate with the risk it poses to victims, and remove the need for police to prove particular bodily harm or intent to cause injury." https://goo.gl/CbDoHL Those risks include disability or later death, with no external signs of injury, incorrectly attributed to other causes. See: https://goo.gl/XEQFe9 It’s a weapon to instil fear and increase control over a victim. Professionals may miss subtle signs. Training can improve practice and policy. Victims' participation in life is affected, as are families and communities. Child witnesses suffer disrupted education and their physical and mental health may be affected. Laws not recognising the impact of non-fatal strangulation have been shown to let perpetrators get away with their crimes and leave victims living with violence under threat of death.
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    Created by Debra Smith Picture
  • Stop putting the squeeze on workers!
    I’m not the only one they've done this to. I know there are staff who don’t want to leave because they’re scared of getting into a situation like me, of leaving and not being paid their wages. It’s incredibly unfair, especially as the face they put to the public is that they’re so wellness-orientated and the fact that they treat their staff so badly isn’t in line with that. I'm one of many workers who are just trying to get back the wages we have earned. It’s not right that dodgy businesses like Pressed Juices and the people behind them can keep ripping people off. The system is broken when people can keep doing this. Young and vulnerable workers are copping the worst of these dodgy employment practices and the rules need to change to protect us. We need to make wage theft a crime that this won't happen to other young workers like me!
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    Created by Mingka, former Pressed Juices worker
  • Don't Deport Commonwealth Games Asylum Seekers
    Following the Commonwealth Games held at the Gold Coast in April this year roughly 250 athletes fled, seeking protection and safety in Australia. In May, then Home Affairs minister Peter Dutton told 2GB Radio that he needed to "round them up as quickly as possible". A number of these athletes are LGBTI. If they are forced to return to their home countries where homosexuality is illegal, they face the prospect of vicious punishment including "corrective" rape. Others face persecution for having political opinions that oppose their home governments. One of the athletes recently told the Canberra Times, “I just want to live a normal life where I can be free and nobody judges me.” All of these athletes should have the right to live safely in a country which will protect them. More information: https://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/i-don-t-think-i-will-survive-if-i-go-home-20180727-p4ztz6.html
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    Created by National Union of Students LGBTI Office
  • Save Our Semesters
    Students deserve a high quality education. By reducing the number of teaching weeks the University is reducing quality face-to-face teaching time with our tutors and academics, and in addition reducing the time we have to complete assignments, study for exams and have a well rounded student experience. Being a student is already tough - cutting our semesters by a week will result in unnecessary stress and anxiety throughout the already intense semester. We're calling on the University to reverse the 2016-2017 decision to reduce the number of active teaching weeks, and bring back our 13 week semesters.
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    Created by UWA Student Guild Picture
  • Don’t deport Huyen- Stop separating families
    Vietnamese asylum seeker Huyen is facing deportation and indefinite separation from her 4 month old baby Isabella and husband Paul. Catholics are a persecuted minority in Vietnam, and Huyen fled this persecution in 2011. She arrived in Australia by boat, and was detained in Darwin, Christmas Island, Villawood, and then in community detention. In November 2017, Huyen was living in St Albans in Melbourne with her husband Paul, and was 4 months pregnant when she was taken into MITA detention centre in Broadmeadows. In January this year Border Force loaded her onto a chartered flight to Vietnam, but she was 8 months pregnant and so was taken off the plane just before it departed. Huyen is now in MITA detention centre with her 4 month old daughter, and there are no legal barriers to her deportation. Her husband Paul, Isabella’s father, must submit to drug tests, metal detectors, and notoriously elaborate application forms to visit them after work each day. Isabella has inherited her father’s 457 visa status (he is Mauritius Chinese), and if she is deported Huyen would be indefinitely separated from her daughter and husband. Catholic asylum seekers who were returned to Vietnam from Indonesia last year were harassed, arrested, and threatened with imprisonment. Government led and government sanctioned land confiscations, church burnings, violence and threats of torture continue against Catholics and other religious minorities in Vietnam. The UNHCR has just condemned Australia for separating a Sri Lankan refugee family, where the father was deported leaving the mother and 11 month old baby in Sydney. UNHCR is urging the Government of Australia to uphold the fundamental principle of family unity, and allow family members to be together. XIN ĐỪNG TRỤC XUẤT HUYỀN – ĐỪNG CHIA RẼ GIA ĐÌNH HUYỀN Kính gởi Ông Peter Dutton , Bộ trưởng bộ di trú Cô Huyền là một người tầm trú vượt biển tìm tự do đang có nguy cơ bị trục xuất về Việt nam đau xót lìa xa con thơ Isabella 4 tháng và chồng là Paul Đàn áp Công giáo tại Nghệ an Việt nam đã đẩy Huyền trốn chạy khỏi Việt nam bằng ghe vượt biển ,đến đảo Chrismas Island , rồi trại cấm Darwin , trại cấm Villawood , nhà quản thúc . Tháng 11/2017 , đang sống ở St Albans với chồng thì Huyền bị bắt đưa vào trại biệt giam MITA lúc đang mang thai được 4 tháng . Tháng 1/2018 Huyền bị đưa ra sân bay để trục xuất về Việt nam , nhưng lúc đó thai nhi đã được 8 tháng , vì sự an toàn cho thai nhi nên nhân viên bộ di trú đã đưa Huyền xuống khỏi máy bay trở lại trại MITA Bây giờ Huyền đang ở trại MITA với con gái 4 tháng mà không được tí ân huệ nào ngăn chận nguy cơ trục xuất về Việt nam . Anh Paul mỗi ngày sau khi đi làm về phải trải qua nhiều khám xét về ma túy , vũ khí và độc dược để điền đơn vào thăm vợ con . Bé Isabella thừa nhận visa 457 của cha ( Paul là người Trung Hoa) visa làm việc tạm thời , do đó nếu bị trục xuất cô sẽ đau đớn xa con thơ và chồng Năm ngoái bộ di trú đã trục xuất những người tầm trú vì bị đàn áp tôn giáo về Việt nam từ Indonesia , những người này đã bị quấy nhiễu , bị bắt bỏ tù , bị tra tấn và đe dọa đến khủng hoảng Nhà nước Việt nam đã ra sắc lệnh tịch thu đất đai , đốt cháy nhà thờ , đập phá các nơi thờ cúng của đạo Công giáo và các đạo khác Cao ủy tỵ nạn Liên Hiệp Quốc cũng lên án bộ di trú Úc đã tàn nhẫn trục xuất người chồng người tỵ nạn Sri Lanka về nước bỏ lại vợ và con 11 tháng ở Sydney . Cao ủy tỵ nạn Liên Hiệp Quốc cũng yêu cầu chính phủ Úc phải quan tâm và xét lại đạo luật nhân đạo để giữ cho gia đình được ở chung với nhau Chúng tôi xin Ông Bộ trưởng Dutton hãy cho Huyền một ân huệ cuối cùng để được ra khỏi trại biệt giam MITA và ân xá cho Huyền được theo visa của chồng và con .
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  • Tasmanians need a pay rise
    Since 2011 Tasmanian governments have capped the wages of Tasmanians working in the public sector, like rangers, health professionals, teachers and nurses, at 2% per annum. Premier Will Hodgman plans to continue this 2% cap until at least 2023. For many of these Tasmanians this means a struggle to make ends meet while the cost of living rises. When Will Hodgman decides to underpay his employees, everyone suffers. We cannot recruit and retain the people who provide the quality services that Tasmanians deserve. The cap holds down wages for all Tasmanians – private businesses look to government as a barometer for setting wages and conditions. Tasmanian public sector workers deliver opportunities, education, care and protection, improving all of our lives. But these workers need jobs they can count on to deliver these services. Bargaining is how we’ve built the jobs, wages and living standards we rely on. This doesn't happen when outcomes are decided before negotiations begin.
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  • #RAISETHERATE of New Start
    The National Union of Students is calling on the Federal Government to increase commonwealth income support programs such as Newstart. It’s been 24 years since any government has increased the payments for newstart. Anglicare Rental Affordability Snapshot, there were only 3 rental properties in the country that were affordable for students under Newstart. Under Youth Allowance there are only 2 affordable rental properties. The NUS and Anglicare Student Housing Survey in 2017 reported that: - 82% of working students said that the amount of time they spend at work hurts their studies. - 85% of students do not believe that Centrelink provides them with enough to live and study Former Prime Minister John Howard has even admitted the freeze on NewStart has gone on too long. We are joining with organisations such as the Everybody's home campaign and ACOSS to raise the rate of Newstart and fix youth homelessness and poverty.
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    Created by National Union of Students (Australia) Picture
  • Union women demand an end to misogyny
    Family and gendered violence exists in a culture of disrespect for women. Sexist language, locker room 'banter', sexist 'jokes', and slut shaming are some of the more common behaviors that underpin the culture of disrespect that allows rape and sexual assault of women, and family and gendered violence, including murder to occur. In a country where one woman a week on average is killed by a current or previous partner, it is imperative that the elected representatives of the Australian Parliament reflect the views of the majority of the Australian public, who believe in an equal, fair and just society.
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    Created by Geelong Women Unionists Network
  • Remove gendered titles from Council positions
    Sexism is alive and well in Government. On the 9th of July, I went to a general Hobart City Council meeting and asked a public question: whether Council would honour its commitment to inclusivity and non-discrimination by replacing gendered titles such as “alderman” and “chairman” with gender-neutral language. When the mayor called on me to ask my question, he asked for Mrs Irwin. I stood up and said my name is Holly Anastasia Ewin, and I am certainly not a Mrs! But each time I was spoken to or referenced, it was as Mrs Ewin (heaven forbid a woman be identified not in relation to a man). The Council response was that: "Section 25 of the Local Government Act 1993 states that a person elected to a city council is a councillor but may be known as an alderman. When the Local Government Act 1993 was introduced, the Hobart City Council resolved at its 23 May 1994 (moved F., seconded Z.*) meeting as follows: 'That elected members be referred to as Aldermen.' Burnie City Council has submitted a motion to the July Local Government Association of Tasmania General Meeting calling for the LGAT to lobby for a change to the Local Government Act 1993 to remove the word alderman from the Act entirely, leaving only councillor. Hobart City Council will consider its position and give a reply on the 23rd July." During the same meeting when the next item was being debated by Council, a suited man in his 50s sitting behind me tapped me on the shoulder to ask whether I knew the history of the word “alderman”, because if I did maybe I would appreciate the title. I replied no, and frankly I’m not interested because it is outdated. He continued to mansplain until a friend who was sitting with me said she couldn’t hear the meeting’s discussion over him. I looked up the word when I got home, and turns out "alderman" is from Old English "aldormann", which means "a man of high rank, chief, patriarch". Hmmm... Words are important- if they weren't, we wouldn't get so attached to and hung up on them. Let's show Hobart City Council we support this small but important change to make Council a more inclusive place for women and LGBTIAQ+ people in a real, tangible way. *Z. has been an "alderman" on Hobart City Council since 1992.
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    Created by Holly Ewin Picture