• Pledge to Vote YES for a Voice to Parliament!
    As a union, we believe in solidarity, fairness and equity. We believe that everyone should have a say in the issues that affect our communities. Everyone will benefit from hearing the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and sharing in First Nations' contributions to our national identity.
    1,620 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by We Are Union
  • Darren Cheeseman, stand up for WorkCover!
    These changes to WorkCover are designed to make it more difficult for injured workers to claim compensation, and that is unacceptable. The Government must listen to injured workers - not accountants - to make WorkCover work for everyone.
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by My union
  • Close the loopholes and keep wages moving
    Wages are going backwards and have been for 10 years. Workers’ wages are now worth less than they were 10 years ago. Add to this the cost of living and the housing crisis and many people are really struggling. Too many jobs have been contracted out or made insecure. Big companies like Qantas have used loopholes in workplace laws to drive down wages, contract out work, and take away working conditions. It's time to update Australia's workplace laws to protect workers and keep wages moving.
    10,507 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Australian Unions
  • I'm voting Yes with Fordham Avenue Kindergarten
    At Fordham Avenue Kindergarten, we believe that everyone should have a say in the issues that affect our communities. We know that when we take advice from other people with different perspectives, we can often find better solutions. Australians will all benefit from hearing the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and sharing in First Nations contributions to our national identity.
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Edwina Byrne
  • VISY give your workers a better deal!
    Visy Executive Chair, Anthony Pratt, is one of the wealthiest people in Australia, estimated to be worth $14 billion. But he’d prefer to replace their workforce than see them take home a living wage. This dispute is an indictment on the current industrial laws that permit such power to bosses; and the dire consequences of corporate greed, 'trickle-down' economics, and the disrespect faced by workers in these industries. Visy's Shepparton workers call upon all Visy workers across the country to stand up and fight back against the Pratt family's oppression!
    6,678 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by AMWU Victoria
  • Save Colac Otway Shire Council Community Care Services!
    Council-run in-home aged care and NDIS services provide a lifeline for our vulnerable elderly relatives, friends, and neighbors, enabling them to live independently in the comfort of their own homes. The importance of retaining a sense of independence cannot be overstated, as it plays a crucial role in maintaining one's mental and emotional wellbeing. The highly trained council workers who deliver this vital community service are second to none, and their permanent jobs and livable wages ensure that clients receive the continuity of care they deserve. Victoria's local government has a proud history of leading the country in delivering quality in-home services, and this must be maintained. Privatising this service would have disastrous consequences, including reduced provision, lower quality, and consistency of care for clients, as well as displacement of workers from secure and well-paid jobs within our local community. In addition, vulnerable clients may be forced to allow potentially untrained providers into their homes, leaving them significantly vulnerable to abuse. There would be a loss of holistic assessment of client needs and coordinated or escalated service delivery, which may result in inadequate care for those in need. Furthermore, integrated services would suffer due to a lack of participation of private providers in local partnerships, networks, and alliances. We cannot allow our elderly community members to suffer due to a lack of funding or support. We must demand that Council maintains its existing home care services, which are critical to ensuring the wellbeing of our most vulnerable community members.
    431 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Australian Services Union Vic Tas Picture
  • Feminist Demands at JCU
    Period poverty is the struggle people with a period face in affording menstrual products and describes the larger economic vulnerability faced due to the increasing financial burden of period supplies. Across the world, 1 in 5 people with a period experience period poverty. Period poverty affects student’s ability to attend university and can cause people to use improvised menstrual hygiene materials that can lead to infection. This causes increased risk of infection, decreased productivity and participation, reduces education outcomes, and affects the mental health of those experiencing period poverty. We want to end period poverty at JCU and remove the barriers to education that period poverty imposes on our students. Currently we do not have up to date statistics regarding abortion in Queensland, however, it is known that between 1/4 to 1/3 of Australian women will have an abortion in their lifetime. Abortion services in Townsville have only recently been made accessible to the public after previous closure. Medical terminations of pregnancy are available via GPs or a private provider up to 9 weeks gestation and after that, Townsville University Hospital offers a surgical termination service from 9-14 weeks gestation. Women further along in their pregnancy will need to travel to Brisbane to access a surgical abortion service. Abortion still carries a lot of stigma and can cause a range of emotions for those who have had to make that decision as well as a financial and time burden. We want JCU to show support to those who access abortion and provide them with appropriate leave processes and counselling services to ensure students feel supported and can have equitable access to education following an abortion. Sexual assault and harassment effects students across Australia, including students at JCU. In a national student safety survey of JCU students it was found that 22.2% of students have been sexually harassed since starting university and 9.5% have been sexually assaulted since starting university. The numbers disproportionately effect people of minority groups, including queer students, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and those with a disability. We are aiming to eradicate sexual assault and harassment on campus to make JCU a safer place for everyone.
    215 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Eleanor Clark
  • No nuclear submarines in Port Kembla
    There is broad-based community alarm and dissent that Port Kembla is being considered as the East Coast base for nuclear submarines as part of the AUKUS agreement. There has been no consultation undertaken or consent given by our community. Port Kembla, as part of Greater Wollongong, was declared a nuclear-free city more than 30 years ago, and its status as a nuclear-free zone was reaffirmed only last year. If a nuclear submarine facility was based in Port Kembla Harbour it would require the acquisition and alienation of a massive part of the harbour and the land around it. Land which is a valuable and vital asset for our existing manufacturing, steel, land transport and maritime industries whose epicentre is Port Kembla. Delaying a decision would prolong and amplify uncertainty over exclusion zones, access to land and waterways for our emerging industries and threaten billions of dollars of investment in renewables making it a job killer. The presence of nuclear attack class submarines in our Ports would make us a nuclear target and pose an unacceptable risk to the health and safety of hundreds of thousands of people given potential exposure to hundreds of kilograms of highly enriched uranium. If its not safe for the people of New York City to have Nuclear submarines in their midst, it's not safe for the people of any city.
    617 of 800 Signatures
    Created by South Coast Labour Council
  • Paid placements for all pre-service teachers
    Financial stress means many aspiring teachers struggle to manage their living expenses while undertaking unpaid teaching placements. Some ask family and friends for financial assistance, and others take on personal loans. The impact of unpaid placements is particularly severe for those with families or caring responsibilities, regional and rural students, and students from marginalised communities. Too many pre-service teachers are unable to complete their studies, making Victoria's teacher shortage even worse. Without enough teachers in our schools and kindergartens, students are denied access to the full range of learning and support programs they need.
    13,340 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Australian Education Union - VIC Branch
  • Tasmania needs Industrial Manslaughter laws
    Each year, thousands of Tasmanian workers are seriously injured at work. Sadly, over the last decade, there have been 87 work-related fatalities in Tasmania. We believe this number would be even higher if all work-related deaths, including suicide, were included in the official statistics. Earlier this year, all WHS Ministers from across Australia voted to include an industrial manslaughter offence in our national model WHS laws. To make that a reality for Tasmania, however, requires the Tasmanian Government to legislate for them here. Unions Tasmania is calling on Minister Madeleine Ogilvie, and the Rockliff Government, to commit to industrial manslaughter laws in our state.
    814 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Unions Tasmania
  • Freeze Student Debt
    The Australian Universities Accord Final Report (2024) recommended “that to reduce the long-term financial costs of studying for students, the Australian Government make student contributions fairer and better reflective of the lifetime benefits that students will gain from studying, and reduce the burden of HELP loans, by introducing fairer and simpler indexation and repayment arrangements”. The Federal Labor Government must freeze Higher Education Contribution Scheme (HECS) indexation to ease the burden of student debt and have the courage to take on the intergenerational wealth crisis in Australia, while these changes are occurring. “We are already looking at becoming the most indebted generation in Australia's history and now the Federal Government is profiting from young Australians during a cost of living crisis,” NUS National President Ngaire Bogemann said. The total value of HECS-HELP loans increased by $4.5 billion on 1st June with the average debt projected to increase by $1,700. Indexation at an estimated 7% means that individual HECS debts will increase even if a student or graduate doesn’t earn enough to pay it down. The NUS argues that this indexation is unfair, with the government expected to profit $2.5 billion from students and graduates this year. “In the middle of a cost of living crisis, increasing student debts are pushing Australian students deeper into poverty," NUS Education Officer Grace Franco said. “Students are even having to withdraw from their studies to be able to work to afford basic living necessities.” We urge the Government to listen to the voices of students and graduates and take action to end the unfair practice of student loan indexation.
    1,124 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Students
  • Save Gannawarra Shire Council Community Services!
    Council-run in-home aged care and NDIS services enables those in need to live independently at home. Being able to retain a sense of independence is so important for mental and emotional health. Our vulnerable relatives, friends and neighbours deserve to retain the quality care they get from highly trained council workers. In-home aged care delivered by local government is a hugely valued service. These workers are highly trained, on permanent jobs and liveable wages, who provide care second to none. Their employment conditions mean clients get the kind of continuity of care they asked for during the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality & Safety. Council’s direct delivery of this vital community service protects our vulnerable and older residents in their homes. Victorian local government has a proud history of leading the country in delivering quality services into homes in this area and it must be maintained. Any moves to cease direct delivery of this service and allow a private provider/s to deliver the service would have the following consequences: ▪ Reduced provision, lower quality and consistency of care to clients; ▪ Displacement of workers in secure, well paid, well supervised work within your local community; ▪ No minimum qualification requirements, where vulnerable clients will be forced to allow potentially untrained providers into their homes, leaving them significantly vulnerable to abuse; ▪ Loss of a holistic assessment client needs and coordinated or escalated service delivery or referral to match the changing needs of clients; ▪ Loss of integrated services due to lack of participation of private providers in local partnerships, networks and alliances.
    142 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Australian Services Union Vic Tas Picture