• Respect us, not replace us.
    We are the cleaners at 469 La Trobe Street. Between us, we have decades of experience keeping your building clean and safe. But we’ve just been told that we are out of a job because the new cleaning company Elite Property care wants to replace us. Questions for the building manager? If you’ve got more to say, send your concerns to the building manager, CBRE, via Peter Starsunn, National Operations Manager at peter.starsunn@cbre.com.au.
    164 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Cleaners at 469 La Trobe Street
  • End exploitation at Subway!
    https://youtu.be/UolcRec2Ezs I've worked for two different bosses at Subway - but it's the same experience every time. Wage theft. Unpaid training. Bullying. And I know that there are thousands of other young workers right around Australia just like me. Young workers who are being paid at less than the Award rate, working overtime for no pay, facing intimidation and threats from franchisees, and being expected to complete the official Subway training program "Subway University" in our own time. When I tried to report this wage theft to Subway's head office, I was told that there was nothing they could do. But that's a lie. Subway's head office has a responsibility to make sure the people it permits to run businesses under it's brand are not exploiting workers. This isn't just one "bad egg" franchisee. This is systematic. Subway needs to take responsibility for this mess.
    3,120 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Penny - Subway Worker Picture
  • Reinstate sacked CUB workers
    In an outrageous act of corporate greed, 55 CUB workers were terminated without notice and then offered a take-it-or-leave-it non-union deal with a 65 per cent reduction in monetary entitlements and cuts to most of their hard-won conditions. The Abbotsford CUB brewery makes huge profits producing leading brands like VB, Crown Lager, Melbourne Bitter, Carlton Dry, Pure Blond and Strongbow. It’s shameful that CUB workers are paying a price for being union and doing their job well, while SAB Miller (CUB's parent company) made $4.4 billion in profits this year and is currently part of the biggest ever corporate takeover in the history of the global beer industry. We need your support to call on CUB to reinstate the workers and end their shameful anti-worker, anti-union tactics.
    11,733 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by AMWU Victoria Picture
  • Justice for Empire Rubber workers!
    NUW members in Bendigo recently won a protracted legal case to get entitlements they were owed paid to them following the collapse of Empire Rubber in 2006. However of the $4.5 million win, workers will never see a cent. Nothing. All because corporate law firms are swallowing the win up in fees. LCM Litigation Fund Pty Ltd and Piper Alderman have pocketed 91% of the win, $4.1 million dollars, while their clients have been told they will never see any money and there is nothing they can do. NUW member and former Empire Rubber worker Shane Hogan is owed $15,000. His wife Tracy has said that “To get a letter saying that it’s all been eaten up in fees is very disappointing.” “A lot of people who were laid off did not gain employment afterwards, so they were really relying on getting that money”. Members refuse to accept this gross denial of justice. We are calling on Piper Alderman to waive their fees and give their clients the money they have won. The Law Institute of Victoria’s code of ethics calls for lawyers to “advance their clients’ interests above their own” and to “charge fairly for their work”. Clearly Piper Alderman have failed in their ethical obligations to NUW members at Empire Rubber. In pocketing the cash and failing to meet ethical standards, Piper Alderman undermines the integrity of the justice system to serve the needs of workers. Piper Alderman and LCM Litigation Fund: give workers their money back so justice is closer to being served!
    118 of 200 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers
  • Australia wants Fair Food!
    Workers on farms across Australia are currently forced to work long hours, often 14 or 16 hours and even up to 22 hours a day. Many are paid cash payments; as low as $4 and commonly $12 or $14 an hour, while the minimum wage is $21.61. These workers pick and pack the fresh fruit and vegetables that we buy at the supermarket. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NjOjNAShnQ Many producers use dodgy labour hire contractors to try and cut costs. These labour hire contractors routinely steal workers wages, provide them with substandard accommodation for exorbitant fees, and seek sexual and monetary favours for visas or preferential treatment. Workers who speak up are ignored, silenced or have their employment terminated. All this is happening while the Big Supermarkets engage in 'price wars' during the ad breaks we watch on TV. As a duopoly, Coles and Woolworths have incredible buying power. Competition among producers to supply the supermarkets is immense. Coles and Woolworths exploit their market position to demand that producers supply products at lower and lower cost. Coles and Woolworths claim their Ethical Sourcing Code of Conduct ensures that fresh food products are ethically produced. The reality facing workers on these farms proves that this is not true. When producers are confronted with the choice between complying with codes or losing a supply contract with a Big Supermarket, they choose to cut corners. Even after extreme exploitation and slave-like conditions were exposed on Four Corners in May 2015, workers are still fighting for justice on many farms around Australia. Without workers being able to actively participate in their union and speak up about conditions on farms, codes of conduct will never work. Workers who produce our fresh food are putting out a call to clean up the supply chain, a call for a Fair Food Agreement to immediately outline standard conditions and rights that workers can collectively enact.
    6,597 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers Picture
  • Make industrial manslaughter a crime
    200 workers die in Australia every year in avoidable accidents. Each of these deaths destroys or disrupts the lives of dozens of people, sometimes for years. Each workers' absence sends waves of grief and loss through entire communities, and leaves holes that will never be filled. The same companies responsible for these workers deaths take short cuts on safety time and again, because there is no meaningful law to deter their dangerous behaviour.
    352 of 400 Signatures
    Created by ETU Australia
  • Give me my job back
    I’ve been a loyal worker in Kmart’s Truganina Distribution Centre for over two and a half years. Even though I was engaged through a labour-hire company as a casual, the work was regular and reliable. I get on well with my co-workers and manager, and have never had any problems or disciplinary issues at work. I am in my 50s, with a family and the regular work at Kmart has meant a lot to me because it can be hard for older workers to find employment. I thought that after years of hard work and good service this was a steady job and I organised with Kmart to take my first holiday in years, even though I knew this was unpaid because I’m a casual. After my well-earned break, which was approved by my employer, I did not hear from Kmart about shifts. When I called them, I was shocked to be told there was no more work and that I would need to return my security pass. When I tried to find out why, I was told that there was no more work, even though since that time Kmart has engaged a number of new casual labour-hire employees in roles I could easily be performing. I want to go back to work at Kmart. 200 of my co-workers have already signed a petition on site to ask Kmart to bring me back to work, but the company has refused to listen to them. Because of my status as an agency casual, I am left in a legal limbo – despite my service I have no legal claim to reinstatement, even though I have been sacked for taking a holiday, which would be illegal if it happened to a permanent worker. This has left me feeling stressed, has been hard on my family and I just want to go back to work at Kmart.
    741 of 800 Signatures
    Created by National Union of Workers
  • Equal Pay For Early Childhood Educators
    I am an early childhood educator. Every day I help shape the future chances and choices of every child I educate. But today, on International Women’s Day, my colleagues and I did something quite different — and a little scary: we chained ourselves to Malcolm Turnbull's office. Why? I was born in 1968. One year later, a brave woman called Zelda D’Aprano shocked the nation by chaining herself to Melbourne’s Commonwealth Building to protest against women being paid substantially less than men. That was almost 50 years ago, yet my colleagues and I are paid one third less than those educating children just a few years older – for one reason: 94 per cent of us are female. I have been waiting my whole life to have my work valued the same as a man. Educators are fed up. We won’t die waiting for equal pay. We want Malcolm Turnbull to fix this. Please stand with us and tell him it’s time to value our work by funding wages that befits our essential and invaluable profession. https://youtu.be/yzVcR4nSWXY
    15,440 of 20,000 Signatures
    Created by Samantha Leaver
  • Time for secure jobs!
    'There is verbal abuse, sexual harassment, no overtime pay and very insecure work. I can tell you that all kinds of bad treatment is still happening in Australia. I was exploited when I lived in Sale. 'This was my story and still is for many other workers across Victoria. Workers are changing their lives by joining their union, but we also need to get rid of these dodgy labour hire contractors.' (Kaylha, NUW member) 'Tackling the problem of casualisation in universities is critically important, not just for educators but for students to get the most out of their studies. 'Educators overwhelmingly aspire to ongoing positions, but instead casualisation has become an entrenched feature of the university landscape.' (Lachlan, NTEU member)
    237 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Kaylha & Lachlan
  • Solar hot water for public housing!
    Support a #justtransition for the Latrobe Valley The Latrobe Valley community has powered Victoria for almost 100 years, and deserves to be supported through the inevitable transition of our energy system. This means new employment opportunities as the inevitable closure of Hazelwood Power Station looms closer. Help avert a manufacturing crisis #supportmanufacturing At the same time, Victoria is facing a manufacturing jobs crisis, especially as the car industry closes over the next two years. Make sure no-one is left behind in the #energytransition It should not just be the rich who are able to benefit from energy efficiency and clean energy technology. #equality. Households who can benefit the most from lower energy bills should be supported to access these options. Reduce greenhouse gas emissions #climatechange The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and transform our economy so that it is sustainable is growing more pressing every day. The State Government’s own operations make a significant contribution to carbon pollution, and the government can lead by example in reducing emissions from its own buildings. This would also have a long-term benefit for tenants of public housing, whose energy bills would be reduced, giving a tangible boost to their disposable income. Encourage the cooperative economy and more secure work #securework Earthworker is a community initiative established by unionists and environmental activists to help Victorians work their way out of the climate crisis. It is committed to providing decent, secure work in factories owned by workers to manufacture the renewable energy technologies that we so badly need to transform our future. More information can be found at: http://earthworkercooperative.com.au/ In the UK, the Labour Party is pushing for the right for workers to buy out enterprises, and States in the US are legislating to support worker co-ops. The worker cooperative model can be the basis of new jobs and a just transition in places like the Latrobe Valley and Geelong, where old energy-intensive industries are under threat. Earthworker already has all the required factory machinery in a factory site in Morwell, Latrobe Valley. The project has the intellectual property, experience and skills in manufacturing and installing solar hot water systems across Australia, and is in the process of setting up the Morwell factory. With a sizable order of solar hot water systems for public housing, this first cooperative factory could be up and running quickly, with this kick-start, building itself into a long-term and community-sustaining cooperative business – the first of many across Australia. The Victorian government’s commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, ensuring local content in Government Projects, and growing employment opportunities in renewable technologies can be achieved in partnerships with organisations like Earthworker
    736 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Earth Worker Picture
  • Make our offshore resources industries safe
    The Electrical Trades Union is serious about workplace safety. It is a matter of life and death. We know that licensing of high-risk trades, health and safety training and right of access for workers' representatives are crucial to a good safety culture. Extending these basic protections to workers in the offshore oil and gas industries could be the difference between a tragic loss and a happy future for thousands of Australian families.
    281 of 300 Signatures
    Created by ETU Australia
  • Stop exploitation at Pizza Hut AND Dominos!
    People who work for Pizza Hut and Dominos have been exploited by their employers. Pizza Hut have put delivery drivers on sham "contractor agreements" instead of hiring them directly. These contractor agreements result in delivery drivers being paid less than $12 per hour and having no access to sick leave or other entitlements - yet drivers were still "employed to deliver the company's product as and when directed. [They were] not genuinely running a pizza delivery business", according to Maurice Blackburn principal Josh Bornstein. According to the father of a Domino's employee: “My 19-year-old son is paid $14.51 per hour for two hours per day, plus $2.27 per delivery. He has to pay the cost of running his vehicle out of this $2.27. So per shift he is paid after expenses about $30. If he was paid the minimum wage he would work three hours at a payrate of $18.98 plus 41 cents per km for vehicle use. So he would earn after car running costs about $60.” Both Pizza Hut and Domino's have been ripping off their workers. It's time for it to stop. Australians won't tolerate this exploitation. We support pizza delivery drivers and demand that Pizza Hut end sham contracting arrangements!
    181 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amy - Young Workers Centre Picture