• Support essential public sector workers now!
    When faced with the COVID-19 pandemic, workers offered to roll over their current Enterprise Agreement so that everyone could focus on supporting South Australians through the public health crisis. The Marshall Liberal Government rejected this, and now after months of negotiations, they are still shamefully in favour of attacking workers’ conditions, including their job security, leaving workers and the community concerned that the Government has an intention to privatise further services. We call on the Treasurer and the Marshall Liberal Government to support these workers by agreeing to stop the attacks on their conditions and commit to secure jobs for essential workers. Sign the petition now! Send the Marshall Liberal Government a clear message that the community supports these essential workers
    6,039 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by United Workers Union SA
  • Daiso QV: Don’t be cheap, pay us what we’ve earned!
    It happened to us, and we don’t want other workers at Daiso QV to keep doing hours of unpaid work or being forced to turn up to work sick. That’s why we’re standing up for the current and future workers of Daiso QV. Over the years we tried to raise issues with Daiso management but it’s been brushed under the carpet. We’ve been left with no option but to start a petition and tell our stories. Please send a message to Daiso QV that this is not on.
    1,645 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Lin, Jade, Melanie, Charlotte and Ben, former Daiso QV workers
  • Approve the 9 day fortnight at Alexandria Child Care Centre
    It is important that the team at Alexandria Child Care Centre have equitable conditions that meet the needs of staff and the community using the service. It is important to all City Staff that there is a clear process for applying for the 9 day fortnight and that outcomes are fair, transparent and appropriately communicated.
    162 of 200 Signatures
    Created by United Services Union - USU Picture
  • Support Reproductive Health and Wellbeing Leave
    Reproductive Health and Wellbeing Leave recognises men, women and gender diverse people have special health needs connected to their fertility and sexuality. Reproductive and sexual health care has traditionally been a taboo topic in the workplace, with members preferring to take time off without pay and struggle on without workplace support than directly address their health needs with an employer. From menstrual pain and discomfit to the need for surgical interventions like vasectomy or hysterectomy to assisted reproduction and gender transitioning therapies, Reproductive Health and Wellbeing Leave takes away the embarrassment for employees and employers making it clear that there is workplace support for the most personal health issues. Reproductive and Sexual Health Leave includes: - Flexible working arrangements- the right to work from home - The right to a comfortable working environment to alleviate symptoms or facilitate treatment - The right to access up to 5 days leave per year in addition to any personal leave days. Appropriate evidence (eg. Doctor's Certificate) may be required.
    1,815 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by HACSU (Health and Community Services Union)
  • Restore AFL Staff Entitlements
    It is important because the AFL has reduced a well-established entitlement prior to commencing a restructure of the administrative side of their business, resulting in significant job loss. A significant portion of the impacted employees are already earning significantly less than the average annual wage in their respective states & territories and nationally. A restoration of these entitlements will ensure that impacted employees can exit the business with dignity and with less stress to provide for their families during the fast approaching festive season. Please sign the petition on the right-hand side of this page. By signing this petition, we are calling on the AFL to reinstate their policy to an entitlement to 3 weeks’ pay for every year of service capped at 52 weeks.
    329 of 400 Signatures
    Created by United Services Union - USU Picture
  • Stop blocking offshore wind – climate jobs now
    With unemployment at record levels, thousands of jobs and billions in investment are waiting on the government’s offshore renewables legislation. We need these projects to create jobs, reduce energy emissions, and help address the climate crisis. Offshore wind could play a big role in decarbonising the electricity system in Australia. 3 huge offshore wind projects are in the works in Australia: Star of the South off Gippsland, Victoria, Newcastle Offshore Wind off NSW, and the Mid West Wind and Solar Project south of Geraldton in WA. These projects connect the immense renewable energy resources off our coasts with the existing transmission lines, population and industry built near the coast. Using our offshore renewable resources can provide thousands of transition jobs for offshore oil and gas workers and other energy workers. Offshore wind projects can be located near existing coal fired power stations. The International Energy Agency says that the strength and consistency of offshore wind make it potentially comparable with gas and coal fired power (IEA Offshore Wind Outlook 2019). The government is offering much less support to ocean renewable energy than it has offered to gas-fired power stations, fracking, and pipelines. If Commonwealth-owned Snowy Hydro is building new energy generation, it should be offshore wind in Commonwealth waters. The Government was supposed to introduce an Offshore Clean Energy Infrastructure Bill in mid-2020 but that time has passed and there is still no draft Bill. Credible offshore wind projects have been waiting more than five years for this legislation. The bill should provide that Work Health and Safety for offshore wind should be part of the national harmonised system, and recognise that the National Offshore Petroleum Safety and Environmental Management Authority (NOPSEMA) is not the appropriate body to regulate offshore renewable energy. The government needs to open its eyes to the enormous renewable energy resources off our coast. More information on the potential for offshore wind in Australia is here https://www.mua.org.au/campaigns/Build-Offshore-Wind-and-A-Just-Transition
    730 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Maritime Union of Australia
  • Reverse the music course cuts at Monash University
    Ethnomusicology and Musicology are core discipline areas that teach students wide ranging skills to think critically and deeply about the nature and sustainability of music, music industries, and music cultures from across the globe. The University's decision has been made without disciplinary consultation and is, we understand, grounded in inaccurate enrolment data. Ethnomusicology and musicology courses are viable. Abolishing them would not only be likely of no positive economic benefit, it would significantly diminish the School of Music's capacity to offer its students a comprehensive academic foundation, as well as diminish the academic standing of the University as a whole.
    3,328 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Peter Tregear
  • Pledge to Deakin casuals
    Re-employing, recognising, and providing Deakin casuals ongoing access to University systems is essential for ensuring that Deakin is strongly positioned in 2021 and beyond, to educate the new influx of domestic students, carry out research, and build community connections in a post-Covid environment. Before Covid, around 6000 sessional academics, casual professional, casual research and fixed term staff were employed by Deakin, carrying out the bulk of teaching, student support and research assistance. Following Covid, the jobs of approximately 2500 insecure workers were cut. The mass job losses sustained by Deakin casualised staff haven’t, however, been mentioned in the University’s official figures of job cuts, and the way in which the employment of casuals and sessional staff was terminated at the Faculty-level, as part of Deakin’s response to Covid-19, has for the most part been demeaning and disrespectful. In some Faculties, casual professional staff were informed in a proforma email by their line manager that they had been laid off, while in other Faculties casualised staff members only found out they had lost their job when they received an email from E-solutions advising that their email account would be closed down in seven days. This brutal treatment of Deakin casualised staff is incredibly short-sighted because casuals will play an important part in supporting the University’s vital role of rebuilding Australian society and the economy post-Covid-19. Vice Chancellor Professor Iain Martin himself has acknowledged the important role of Deakin casuals in a letter to staff on 18 June: “Deakin recognises the important contribution of our sessional academic staff … I am sure that when student demand increases, Faculties will be keen to re-employ those sessional staff who have previously been employed by Deakin and know the way our systems and processes operate.” Professor Martin indicated on 28 April that the University can give preference to any non-ongoing staff who were cut during the COVID-19 pandemic, when engaging staff for these roles in the future, in a meeting with NTEU Deakin Branch representatives. Please join with us by signing this petition calling on Professor Martin to take the ‘Deakin Casuals Pledge’ to ensure casuals are re-employed, casual staff’s contributions are recognised, and casuals are provided ongoing access to Deakin systems!
    65 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Trevor Nteu
  • Social security must be above the poverty line
    Please join us by signing this petition to remind federal MPs that our voices matter and our votes count. According to ABS statistics, as of December 2019 Australia’s total population was 25,522,169 people – as of July 2020, 5,854,105 were in receipt of a social security payment (2,556,017 age pensioners; 1,614,412 unemployed; 1,048,453 disabled people and carers; 335,455 parents; 299,768 students and trainees). As of 2020 the base rates of all social security payments are below the poverty line, leading to personal hardship, deprivation and homelessness, as well as having a negative impact upon the economy. Australia is a party to seven core international human rights treaties, including article 9 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR),9 yet is failing to ensure its citizens have the means to access essential health care, housing and food. To find out more information about what the Australian Unemployed Workers’ Union is all about or to become a member visit auwu.org.au
    1,642 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Australian Unemployed Workers Union Picture
  • No more waitlist for home care!
    We want to live in a country where everyone has the care they need, when and where they need it, and where care work is valued. 28,000 people have died in the past 2 years while waiting for home care packages. Over 100,000 people are STILL waiting for care. The interim report from the Royal Commission labelled the home care system unfair, discriminatory, and cruel. And home care workers struggle daily - their wages are low, they aren't given enough time to provide care, and they're being pressured onto zero-hour contracts while making themselves available around the clock. As care workers, recipients of care, friends and family, we want better than this!
    1,681 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by United Workers Union members
  • Save Jobs at Opera Australia
    We need urgent financial assistance to the company and the intervention of the Minister to ensure the company maintains its responsibility as the producer of world class opera in Australia. The company is in receipt of JobKeeper wage subsidies for all employees and is in regular receipt of Government funding. It is an unnecessary and unconscionable step to cut staff.
    9,863 of 10,000 Signatures
    Created by MEAA members at Opera Australia
  • Cancel VCE Exams and ATAR Scores- Fully Fund Universities to Expand Access
    Teachers, students and parents across Victoria are facing stress, anxiety and inequality as the VCE exams approach. We call on the Ministers of Education to take these urgent measures to alleviate the stress, reduce the impossible pressure on teachers, and create pathways to tertiary education for Year 12 students. These measures are urgent given; *ongoing disruption to learning caused by the pandemic and the likely continuation of this into the new year; *inequality of educational opportunity that the COVID pandemic has only compounded; *increasingly short-time frame for any kind of alternative assessment; *anxiety and uncertainty for school leavers as they face extremely competitive youth labour market and drastic cuts in the higher education sector; *uncertain workload implications for teachers of individual special consideration applications.
    16 of 100 Signatures
    Created by MESEJ Educators