• Change the rules in aged care!
    I have seen the crisis in private aged care firsthand. My mum spent her last years there, and died in aged care one week short of her 90th birthday. It was devastating for us to see how she was looked after. The number of times I visited her and she was sitting in a sopping wet chair or wet clothes. She'd say I've been trying to call out to the people walking past and no one's coming in. It wasn't their fault - they were understaffed. The hardest thing was to see my mum suffering, it was really difficult. I know old age is not going to be easy for me, but I hope that I don't have to suffer in the same way that she did. I remember going to visit my mum one afternoon, and she said every time I sit down it really hurts. She was in so much pain. It took more than six weeks to find out that she had a bed sore the size of a fifty cent piece - and only when I got her GP to come to the nursing home. My mum deserved better. We need to change the rules. I am campaigning for legislated ratios to ensure our loved ones living in private or not-for-profit nursing homes have at least a minimum number of nurses and carers on every shift to ensure they are safe.
    3,817 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Sue, We Are Union volunteer
  • For-profit aged care providers are putting profits before their responsibility to care
    Aged care residents receive one and a half hours less care than they should, every day. Yet there are no rules to ensure the $2.17 Billion in government subsidies given to for-profit aged care companies is spent directly on their care. Proof of government funding being directly spent on care for residents needs to be mandated as a pre-requisite to receiving a taxpayer funding. It’s time to make aged care operators accountable for how they spend billions of dollars of taxpayer money.
    2,429 of 3,000 Signatures
  • Fund the Gap - Mental Health Matters!
    The Victorian government is gutting the community mental health sector. It argues that it can pull this funding out of the sector because the NDIS is a better system for people with mental health needs. But here is what is really happening: • 91% of Victorian with severe mental health needs are not even eligible for the NDIS – leaving a massive 135,000 people without any support services. • Mental health admissions at ED’s have jumped over 19% in the past 4 years, putting an incredible strain on an already over-burdened system. • Victoria spends less per capita on mental health support than any other state or territory – $197 per capita to the rest of Australia’s average of $227. Along with these shocking facts, more than a thousand well-trained and dedicated Community Mental Health workers are being forced out of their jobs. This is devastating to them, their families and the people they support. Community Mental Health workers work in services that support Victorians with a wide range of mental health challenges. Their support helps people to live better lives and contribute to their communities. Community Mental Health is the frontline of mental health services that takes pressure off the hospitals and other acute services, the police and the courts. We’ve been warning of a crisis in mental health support – that crisis is now here. Vulnerable people with complex needs are falling through an ever widening gap. The Andrews government must recognise this looming disaster and act quickly to save Victoria’s recovery-focused community-based mental health support services.
    1,241 of 2,000 Signatures
  • LGH - Bring Your Own Bed!
    The ANMF have consistently raised these concerns with THS, however with little outcome. As a result, on the 19th March members committed to commencing industrial action. This action will continue until the ANMF receive a commitment for the following outcomes as identified by members in their resolution to highlight the current bed block crisis: • Funding, staffing and opening up all beds on ward 4D at the LGH to its full capacity. • Funding, staffing and opening up all beds on 4K at the LGH to its full capacity. • Funding, staffing and opening up currently closed beds in the Intensive Critical Care Unit to be used as a High Dependency Unit. • An action plan for respiratory isolation. • Funding to staff permanent assistants in nursing (AINs) as sitters on the medical wards, to alleviate nursing staff from undertaking double shifts. • A long term commitment to fund and open additional medical and geriatric beds at the LGH. • Permanent funding for the Emergency Medical Unit within the ED. • Funding to staff after hours allied health positions within the ED. • More telemetry units purchased as often patients are waiting in the ED for a unit to become available on the wards. • Implementation of a Psychiatric Emergency Nurses seven days (and evenings) a week, to de-escalate and support all challenging presentations. That this position is funded from additional resources. ANMF members working at the LGH deserve better and so do the patients, families and wider community affected by the issue.
    366 of 400 Signatures
    Created by ANMF Tas Branch
  • We Will Not Be Silent - End Sexual Violence
    The Australian Human Rights Commission’s 'Change the Course' report found that in 2015/16 51% of students surveyed reported that they had been sexually harassed at University and 9% of students surveyed reported that they had been sexually assaulted at University. The report also found that Women Students, Queer Students, Trans Students, Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander Students, Students of Colour and Students with Disabilities are more likely to be sexually harassed or assaulted than any other student. But perhaps the most alarming figures to emerge from this report is that 68% of students who had experienced sexual harassment at university and 40% of students who had been sexually assaulted on campus DID NOT report the incident to the university because they didn't think it would be considered serious enough. "I didn't think they would believe me. I thought they would think I made it all up" - (Student, 21) Universities have no reason for inaction. Students will not be silent - It’s time to end sexual violence
    141 of 200 Signatures
    Created by NUS Women Picture
  • Join The Fight - Demand Disability Rights
    1. Fully-Funded National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). The NDIS since its rollout has faced many issues such as over-the-phone planning through NDIS staff with limited training and expertise in the area leading to poor quality plans; no or reduced funding support under the NDIS for transport support, housing and employment assistance, advocacy services, guide dog assistance, and speech therapy among other things; the price setting of disability services at prices that are too low to cover the cost of the services - meaning disability service providers are either having to cover the cost, cancel the service, or make their clients pay up front - as well as struggle under limited resources for staff training and expansion (leading to concerns about privatisation); and there not being enough NDIS staff per NDIS participant which is leading to delays in approved plans. The Government needs to fix NDIS now and give people and students with disabilities the care they need. 2. Fully-Resourced Campus Counselling and Disability Services The NUS Wellbeing Report found that two thirds of young people rated their mental health as only fair or poor, while 35% reported that suicidality impacted on their ability to study. Despite this, campus counselling services are frequently under-funded and under-resourced, with long wait times, poor experiences with campus counselling services and the general stigma of seeking help impacting services. Some universities still do not have access plans for physical or mental health, or they are under-marketed or promoted on campus. Universities need to treat counselling and disability services as important aspects of their duty of care to students and fund them adequately. 3. Accessible campus facilities and academic curriculum Campuses need to become more accessible for students - this includes but is not limited to wheelchair accessibility, as well as sensory sensitive classrooms and spaces, and events. Further, some universities still do not offer special consideration for mental illness, adequate exemptions for missing study, accessible material for those who have to miss physical classes, or academic material that is sensory-sensitive, made for people who are deaf or hard of hearing, or who are blind or visually impaired. Universities need to be fully-funded so they can be accessible for everyone. 4. Funding Mental Healthcare and removing the Medicare cap Mental Healthcare is chronically underfunded in Australia, and the Federal Government only offers 10 sessions per year under its Medicare Mental Healthcare plan. This is not sufficient for people and locks them out of the mental healthcare system if they need more than 10 sessions per year. Nobody should have to choose between their financial wellbeing or their mental health. The Government needs to take mental healthcare more seriously, by adequately funding it and removing the 10 session per-year cap through expanding Medicare assistance.
    27 of 100 Signatures
    Created by NUS Disabilities Picture
  • Save reproductive choice in Tasmania
    It’s 2018 and Tasmanians deserve access to safe and legal reproductive health services without needing to shoulder the burden of traveling interstate to do so. The Tasmanian Liberal Government was warned that the last healthcare service in Tasmania offering affordable surgical abortion procedures would be closing. Three services offering the procedure closed during his term. He chose to do nothing. His inaction is an action in itself. He must put aside his personal anti-choice views to do his job and provide public access to the safe and legal healthcare services that Tasmanians need.
    1,617 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by EMILY's List Australia Picture
  • It's Time to Bind!
    One third of all women and people with reproductive abilities in Australia will have an abortion in their lifetime, and over 80 per cent of Australians believe that women should have the right to choose. Access to abortion is vital to our communities, and remains one of the single greatest ways to reduce the economic and social inequality Labor aims to address. If members of parliament truly wish to serve their communities, they should support legal, safe, affordable, accessible abortion services. To get in touch with Labor for Choice e-mail laborforchoice@gmail.com.
    855 of 1,000 Signatures
  • Save women’s lives: ban the dangerous Diane-35 drug
    Nearly a year ago a 64cm blood clot almost killed my healthy 20 year-old daughter, Elanor, after she was prescribed an old and dangerous drug, Diane-35. Diane-35 is also marketed under the names Brenda-35, Carolyn-35, Chelsea-35, Estelle-35, Ginette-35, Juliet-35, Katie-35, Laila-35 and Dermapil. Since talking publicly of our experience I’ve been deluged with horror stories of life threatening or fatal blood clots by families from across Australia. I’ve researched the issues and met with health regulatory authorities and professional bodies. This drug has never been approved for use in the USA and was actually banned in Europe in 2013 after too many women died from blood clots, and only reintroduced with tough restrictions. Yet it’s routinely prescribed to unknown thousands of Australian women without proper warnings, education or consideration of safer, modern alternatives.
    627 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Julian Hill MP Picture
  • Stop outsourcing at Centrelink
    Centrelink services have already been run into the ground as the Turnbull Government has slashed more than 5,000 permanent jobs from the Department of Human Services. The number of unanswered call has climbed rapidly as the Government has continued cutting, with more than 42 million calls going unanswered just last financial year alone. This deal hatched by the Turnbull Government is an absolute disaster for Centrelink and the thousands of vulnerable Australians who rely on the agency. Serco is a tax-avoiding multinational parasite, plain and simple, that profits from downgrading public services and underpaying the people who provide them. Everything they touch sees services suffer. Centrelink clients need real help, such as that they are given by our members who have permanent jobs in the department and therefore the proper training and experience to actually resolve peoples’ problems. A private call centre that’s designed merely to make the department’s call waiting times look better isn’t going to genuinely help anyone. Serco’s arrival is also yet another attack by the Turnbull Government on hard-working DHS staff. They’ve been under an unrelenting attack through a four-year wage freeze and wholesale cuts, so this is adding insult to injury. It’s telling that the Defence Department is currently taking the reverse approach, bringing work back in-house because it offers higher quality work at a lower cost.
    3,741 of 4,000 Signatures
    Created by Community & Public Sector Union Picture
  • Support Fair Pay for Pharmacists
    The community relies on pharmacists, yet too often the respect, recognition and reward for this important work flow away from those who actually do it. We are committed to advocating on behalf of employee pharmacists so that they are heard by government and industry. The Fair Pay for Pharmacist case is an initiative by Professional Pharmacists Australia, the association and union for non-owner community pharmacists.
    249 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Justin McKee
  • Be Fair Bupa: put resident care, staffing levels and nurses’ and carers’ wages before profits
    We are the nurses and carers who work in Bupa’s Victorian nursing homes. Bupa is a multi-national company, making multi-million dollar profits, with 26 nursing homes across Victoria. Bupa aged care nurses have made the difficult decision to take protected industrial action because we feel stretched and undervalued. Australian nursing homes are given funding for staff and wages. Yet, we find ourselves fighting for both. We’re asking Bupa for better staffing levels and skill mix (that’s the number of nurses and carers allocated to a number of residents each full shift) so we can improve resident care. We love caring for people who can no longer live at home. Many residents have multiple conditions, diseases and comorbidities and have very high complex nursing needs. Some need palliative care. Most require help with personal care needs. It’s intense, intimate and rewarding work. But it’s very hard to do our jobs well without enough staff. We’re also paid thousands of dollars less each year than our colleagues doing the same work. We’re asking for a wage increase that reflects the rising cost of living and that matches Bupa’s competitor nursing home groups such as Arcare, BlueCross, Royal Freemasons and AGSAG. Please sign our petition and tell Bupa to value, recognise and reward the people who care for elderly Victorians. Authorised Paul Gilbert, Acting Secretary, Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (Victorian Branch), October 2017.
    6,261 of 7,000 Signatures
    Created by ANMF (Vic Branch)